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Re: Classic Snooker

Postby Dan-cat

I would have loved if you'd included his celebration when he won that one ranking tournament, it was a double fist-pump screamer!!!!!

Re: Classic Snooker

Postby TheSaviour

Alex was a break-builder, he was already then the similar as they almost all are these days.

Paul Hunter also was a solid break-builder. He too was slightly ahead of his own time. He had all the structures, the way he constructed all those breaks and putted all his physics working solidly and flawlessly. Watching those tons from Paul is a highly educative.

That´s really bizarre that both of those players well ahead of their own time are already gone. When they shouldn´t be. I suppose that´s just life.

Mark Selby certainly is the man who should be mentioned here. I´ve never before heard a roar as loud as it at times it is when the crowds are learning that he is walking in the venue. And that´s all well deserved.

I have started to use the Instagram now also! Or at least singed up. You never know if you will need something. I am done with all the silly joking. No-one never were amused or anything. I am just a really suprised some people here have started to use that I love the Saviour - mention. I :lov: Susanne.... ?

Re: Classic Snooker

Postby Dan-cat

TheSaviour wrote:...

Mark Selby certainly is the man who should be mentioned here. I´ve never before heard a roar as loud as it at times it is when the crowds are learning that he is walking in the venue. And that´s all well deserved.

I have started to use the Instagram now also! Or at least singed up. You never know if you will need something. I am done with all the silly joking. No-one never were amused or anything. I am just a really suprised some people here have started to use that I love the Saviour - mention. I :lov: Susanne.... ?


Ronnie's roar is louder!! haha. What's your Instagram Savey?? I'm https://www.instagram.com/dan_cat/ I started using it recently and got into it and now i'm a bit bored of it. I only like looking at my pictures not other peoples. Lolz. Be still thy quivering ego.

Re: Classic Snooker

Postby Badsnookerplayer

jopesalmi wrote:Alex Higgins' great 118 break from 1982 WC Final: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3CBEdvfp2k


Thanks Jope - your best vid yet. You are building a following!

I had never seen this break but enjoyed every second of that.

Watching Higgins at the table is a trip of boundless variations. He paints a vital picture of anger, beauty and human frailty with every step. Each sinew in his fragile body is fighting ferociously with the tics in his mind. Time and again, he is found out - human judgement pulled sharply into cold,mathematical focus on the green rectangle of truth. From hopeless positions he conjures a breathless escape and the crowd love him. But he will never love them as much, and that is understood; an unwritten contract. He is not there for you, you are there to admire him. And how we did.

Higgins at the table is art. Not fine art but raw, visceral, dangerous art the like of which we are allowed to view but never own. It is ephemeral, floating in the air in front of us but try to catch it - to possess it - and buck you, it is gone and will never return.

So, here's to you Alex as the last of the night's poison passes my lips. Here's to you, you vodka swilling, angst filled, fedora wearing, impossible break building, lend us a tenner, snake hiss in your plantpot, genius of a human being.

Viva the Hurricane..

Re: Classic Snooker

Postby Dan-cat

Badsnookerplayer wrote:
jopesalmi wrote:Alex Higgins' great 118 break from 1982 WC Final: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3CBEdvfp2k


Thanks Jope - your best vid yet. You are building a following!

I had never seen this break but enjoyed every second of that.

Watching Higgins at the table is a trip of boundless variations. He paints a vital picture of anger, beauty and human frailty with every step. Each sinew in his fragile body is fighting ferociously with the tics in his mind. Time and again, he is found out - human judgement pulled sharply into cold,mathematical focus on the green rectangle of truth. From hopeless positions he conjures a breathless escape and the crowd love him. But he will never love them as much, and that is understood; an unwritten contract. He is not there for you, you are there to admire him. And how we did.

Higgins at the table is art. Not fine art but raw, visceral, dangerous art the like of which we are allowed to view but never own. It is ephemeral, floating in the air in front of us but try to catch it - to possess it - and buck you, it is gone and will never return.

So, here's to you Alex as the last of the night's poison passes my lips. Here's to you, you vodka swilling, angst filled, fedora wearing, impossible break building, lend us a tenner, snake hiss in your plantpot, genius of a human being.

Viva the Hurricane..


This is a joyously written Baddies-been-at-the-sauce late-night paean to the one without whom I doubt we'd be even talking on this forum. The green rectangle of truth indeed.

So, here's to you Alex as the last of the night's poison passes my lips. Here's to you, you vodka swilling, angst filled, fedora wearing, impossible break building, lend us a tenner, snake hiss in your plantpot, genius of a human being.

:hatoff:

Re: Classic Snooker

Postby Pink Ball

Dan-cat wrote:
Badsnookerplayer wrote:
jopesalmi wrote:Alex Higgins' great 118 break from 1982 WC Final: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3CBEdvfp2k


Thanks Jope - your best vid yet. You are building a following!

I had never seen this break but enjoyed every second of that.

Watching Higgins at the table is a trip of boundless variations. He paints a vital picture of anger, beauty and human frailty with every step. Each sinew in his fragile body is fighting ferociously with the tics in his mind. Time and again, he is found out - human judgement pulled sharply into cold,mathematical focus on the green rectangle of truth. From hopeless positions he conjures a breathless escape and the crowd love him. But he will never love them as much, and that is understood; an unwritten contract. He is not there for you, you are there to admire him. And how we did.

Higgins at the table is art. Not fine art but raw, visceral, dangerous art the like of which we are allowed to view but never own. It is ephemeral, floating in the air in front of us but try to catch it - to possess it - and buck you, it is gone and will never return.

So, here's to you Alex as the last of the night's poison passes my lips. Here's to you, you vodka swilling, angst filled, fedora wearing, impossible break building, lend us a tenner, snake hiss in your plantpot, genius of a human being.

Viva the Hurricane..


This is a joyously written Baddies-been-at-the-sauce late-night paean to the one without whom I doubt we'd be even talking on this forum.[/i][/b]


I have little love for Higgins, but without him I'd probably not have engaged with snooker in the way that I did. Snooker would have been a hobby to me rather than a passion. Curious stuff.

Re: Classic Snooker

Postby TheSaviour

Jope could well inform us if he is going to have the day off.

Meanwhile no-one is going to make any sense.

Unfortunately.

Re: Classic Snooker

Postby Badsnookerplayer

Great vid Jope - love Big Bill's shot at 2:00.

I have always thought that Bill W. seemed a genuinely great guy. I have never heard a bad word said about him, and he seemed to have a wonderful attitude to snooker and life. It is easy to romanticise sport when we look to the past, but he did seem to be a free spirit. I guess he was unlikely to make it to old age, but many of his obituaries did not do him justice as they focussed on his drinking as if he was a stereotypical 70's pisshead. I am sure he would have loved to be free of the health problems that he had and not remembered for his drinking. These days he would - I hope - be treated more sympathetically.

Despite this, things I loved about Bill Werbeniuk:

He had his own coach (which he drove) to travel to tournaments and exhibitions.
He hit 'that' shot
He chose to go 'commando' despite the risk to his trousers that his weight brought.
He was a nice guy.
He held the highest televised break for a while - a wonderful break.
He inspired Marco Fu.
I shouldn't perhaps but I do like the fact that any man can drink 30 pints of lager and play superb snooker.

One of my heroes.

Re: Classic Snooker

Postby Badsnookerplayer

Thanks JPS - I like Stephen Hendry's topspin shot to stay on the black.
Extreme topspin shots are my favourite shots.
So much top spin that it keeps the cueball banging against the top cushion.
I can't get enough of it.