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Tornament

Postby pkwd1

In a doubles tornament, if a person wins the first game and loses the next game, Is that person out of the tornament? Also if a person loses the first game does he get a second game, and if he wins the second game does that person go into a third game? I don't understand if that person gets a third game, Yet my first question
that person doesn't get another game.

Re: Tornament

Postby SteveJJ

I think Dan missed the answer to this conundrum in his seminar.

Re: Tornament

Postby acesinc

pkwd1 wrote:In a doubles tornament, if a person wins the first game and loses the next game, Is that person out of the tornament? Also if a person loses the first game does he get a second game, and if he wins the second game does that person go into a third game? I don't understand if that person gets a third game, Yet my first question
that person doesn't get another game.


Your question is rather poorly worded and so it is difficult to understand. I think you are using the incorrect phrase when you say "doubles tornament" (correct spelling is "...tournament"). The phrase "doubles tournament" implies that there are two snooker players on each team alternating turns at the table so there are four snooker players in the match. This is a format that is not used very often for professional Snooker though it is common for amateurs to play snooker using this format.

Instead, I believe you meant to ask about what is known as a "double elimination tournament". This is a very common format for American pool tournaments but to the best of my knowledge, it is not used in snooker tournaments at all. All of your questions will be answered when you understand what is meant by the phrase "double elimination". In most snooker tournaments, as soon as a player loses one "game" (or more accurately, as soon as the player loses one "match"), that player is eliminated from the tournament. "Double elimination" simply means that after his first loss, the player will remain in the tournament, but will be moved into the "Loser's Bracket". Even with one loss, that player may continue to play other players on the Loser's Bracket and if he (or she) wins every one of those matches, he will play against the winner of the Winner's Bracket in order to determine the ultimate winner of the tournament. If a player loses a second match, he is immediately out of the tournament (hence, "double elimination").

This is probably easiest to understand if you look at a photograph of the brackets used for a double elimination tournament. A very good example can be found here:

http://www.erasabletournamentbrackets.c ... racket.jpg

The players are number 1 to 4. The loser of each of the first two matches is moved to the lower bracket (now named, "A" and "B"...A is either 1 or 2 (whoever lost above) and B is either 3 or 4 (whoever lost above). With this knowledge, I now think that you will understand the rest of the bracket. Note that in the Final, the winner of the Winner's Bracket plays the winner of the Loser's Bracket. If the winner of the Winner's Bracket wins that match, then the tournament is over and he is the Champion. On the other hand, if the winner of the Loser's Bracket wins that match, the the tournament is not yet over. This will have been the very first loss for the winner of the Winner's Bracket so that he has not been "double eliminated". The same two players must then play another match. Whoever loses this match is now "double eliminated" and therefore the winner is now Tournament Champion.

Another point to be made about Double Elimination tournaments is that every round has the same match format, unlike standard Snooker tournaments in which each round may have a different format. So in a Double Elimination tournament, every round including the Final may be a "Race to 5" (meaning the same as "Best of 9" in a Snooker tournament) while in a Snooker tournament, the first round may be Best of 7, next round may be Best of 9, and the Final may be Best of 11 (or any other variation).

The sample bracket that is linked shows a very simple tournament with just four players, but the exact same concept is used for large tournaments with 32, 64, even 128 players or more.

I hope I interpreted your question correctly and I hope that helps you to understand a Double Elimination tournament format.

Re: Tornament

Postby Pink Ball

In a doubles tornament, if you win your first game you qualify for a second game. If you win your second game, you survive, but you require one more win to take the traditional doubles tornament prize, a fruit hamper.

If you lose either your first or second game, however, you will be subjected to a quick but painful anal probe.

I hope this helps.

Re: Tornament

Postby pkwd1

I found the replies a bit complicated... I hope this is more plain...I think I am talking about "double elimination tournament" in a doubles game, as an amateur. I have played in a tourname where I was eliminated of which i won the first game and lost the second game, after which put me out of the competition, My opponents of the first game went into the repertuar of which I understand, if they lost that game then they would be out of the tournament. But if they win the second game, I understand they can move on to a third game. So.. I win one then lose one I'm out of the tournament, If the person loses one then wins one they are able to go on to a third game... My question is... Why couldn't I go on to a third game, the same as my previous opponents who went into the repertuar?

Re: Tornament

Postby fridge46

It could be the tournament is essentially two competitions: a Main Draw with a Consolation Draw for first round losers only.

This format is used quite often in LTA (Lawn Tennis Assocation) junior tournaments to ensure everyone gets at least 2 matches.

Re: Tornament

Postby Dan-cat

SteveJJ wrote:I think Dan missed the answer to this conundrum in his seminar.


haha I'll use Ace's text to answer fully :-D

Re: Tornament

Postby EveretteF

Pink Ball wrote:In a doubles tornament, if you win your first game you qualify for a second game. If you win your second game, you survive, but you require one more win to take the traditional doubles tornament prize, a fruit hamper.

If you lose either your first or second game, however, you will be subjected to a quick but painful anal probe.

I hope this helps.


As long as it's quick. Kidding aside, that explanation makes complete sense.