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Lowest scores to win frames?

Postby HustleKing

Another random thread to pass some time in the extended lock down.

Anyway, what are the some lowest scores you guys remember that won frames? (including Seniors matches!)

I can imagine there's been plenty of times players have won with scores in the 40s (particularly if their opponents potted a lot of the balls beforehand) but I imagine 2 pro players would be too good for neither if them to pass the 40 mark in one frame.

I can't recall any instances where a player won with a score that was at most 49, but maybe there was a lot of this stuff back in the pre-Hendry days were centuries were less common?

Re: Lowest scores to win frames?

Postby vodkadiet1

There have been quite a few won with a lower score than 49. I remember a frame that had a total of 48 points scored between Nigel Bond and Jamie Burnett. Bond won it 40-8.

There are quite a lot more though.

Re: Lowest scores to win frames?

Postby vodkadiet1

csprince wrote:the lowest frame score was graham miles beat barry mapstone 34-16 at the 1996 british open.


That may well be the lowest score to win a frame without the 3 miss rule. But that is 50 points scored combined. The Bond vs Burnett match was 48 points. There may well be one with lower total points than that.

Of course it is theoretically possible to have a frame where only 18 points are scored but that is providing a player 'A' pots all 15 reds off of the break off and then goes in off! That would be 4-0 and then player 'B' clears to the blue and leaves the pink hanging right over a pocket with no way for player 'A' to keep it on the table. Obviously player 'A' could then make a deliberate foul by following in off and making it 0-24 and keeping the frame alive but in reality it would be a legitimate concession at 0-18.

Although the lowest score could theoretically be 16-2 if in the above scenario player 'A' had taken the yellow instead of being pointless.

If the above scenario ever happened I would begin to believe that Jesus Christ was going to come back to Earth and start preaching again!
Last edited by vodkadiet1 on 12 Apr 2020, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Lowest scores to win frames?

Postby HustleKing

csprince wrote:the lowest frame score was graham miles beat barry mapstone 34-16 at the 1996 british open.


Great shout, any info on Mapstone's age at the time? Miles was 54/55, so you could realistically see him have a frame where his potting deserts him :-D

Re: Lowest scores to win frames?

Postby vodkadiet1

HustleKing wrote:
csprince wrote:the lowest frame score was graham miles beat barry mapstone 34-16 at the 1996 british open.


Great shout, any info on Mapstone's age at the time? Miles was 54/55, so you could realistically see him have a frame where his potting deserts him :-D


Mapstone was born 12 September 1976, so he was 19.

Re: Lowest scores to win frames?

Postby HustleKing

vodkadiet1 wrote:
HustleKing wrote:
csprince wrote:the lowest frame score was graham miles beat barry mapstone 34-16 at the 1996 british open.


Great shout, any info on Mapstone's age at the time? Miles was 54/55, so you could realistically see him have a frame where his potting deserts him :-D


Mapstone was born 12 September 1976, so he was 19.


Well then he definitely doesn't get off the hook, a decent 13 year old would easily get 17+ if their opponent was missing lots of pots <doh>

Re: Lowest scores to win frames?

Postby SnookerEd25

Never saw Mapstone play, but this was the 'open' era, when anyone who paid £500 (I think it was) could have a go on the tour; consequently, there were 500+ active professionals and each tournament had to whittle the number down by featuring about 20 qualifying rounds (look them up on CueTracker). Therefore, it is fair to assume that Mapstone may or may not have been a half-decent club player by today's standards.

Re: Lowest scores to win frames?

Postby vodkadiet1

SnookerEd25 wrote:Never saw Mapstone play, but this was the 'open' era, when anyone who paid £500 (I think it was) could have a go on the tour; consequently, there were 500+ active professionals and each tournament had to whittle the number down by featuring about 20 qualifying rounds (look them up on CueTracker). Therefore, it is fair to assume that Mapstone may or may not have been a half-decent club player by today's standards.


I think this started in 1991.