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Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History?

Steve Davis
2
10%
Stepehn Hendry
8
38%
John Higgins
3
14%
Ray Reardon
1
5%
Mark Selby
4
19%
Peter Ebdon
0
No votes
Mark Williams
1
5%
Other
2
10%
 
Total votes : 21

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Cloud Strife

Certainly not Davis or Hendry. Both of those were flat-track bullies who crumbled when someone actually fought back at them or didn't bottle it against them.

Probably go with Higgins. Maybe Selby too.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Truth

Davis: Although his temperament was good, I don't think it was exceptional. In his prime he seemed to rely on his all around superior play, and there were a few times when his opponents managed a surprising fightback that he seemed to wilt (83 UK final and 85 World final most famously). Winning the 07 Masters from 8-4 down is perhaps one of Steve's most famous comebacks, but I think O'Sullivan gave him some help.

Hendry: Temperament was considered rock solid during his most dominant years. Many players were afraid of him, and sometimes they would surprise themselves and find they were a few frames in front. Few players had the guts to convert their lead though, and Hendry was like a shark when he sensed blood. Perhaps his comebacks against Hallett in 91 Masters, and White in 92 Worlds are most well known. My only criticism is that he seemed to lose this edge once that the O'Sullivan, Higgins and Williams trio had matured. Hendry was a bully on the table, and I don't think he had quite the same confidence when he was up against players who weren't afraid of him.

Higgins: I think his temperament has improved with age. He has obviously had some amazing fightbacks in the last decade, and a knack of finding his best snooker when it matters the most. Some great comebacks against top level opposition including Maguire 07 WC, Williams 10 UK, Trump 12 Shanghai. Higgins has also converted some classic matches in terms of the playing standard, especially the 06 Masters final (10-9) and his World Q-Final against Selby (13-12) (Selby made 5 centuries and played incredibly).

Reardon: He was before my time, so I can't legitimately comment.

Selby: In a sense I think his temperament has indirectly led to the hate that many snooker followers feel towards his game. When Selby is in trouble he keeps things tight. Any player can attempt to do this in theory, but it requires incredible tactical nounce, patience and temperament to make this strategy work. So a Selby comeback will be slow, painful and inevitable. O'Sullivan calls him "The Torturer", and that's understandable when Ronnie seems to lead for a while nearly every time Selby beats him. Selby will happily grind down great tactical players too. He did this to Higgins in their 07 World final, converting a 12-4 deficit to 14-13 (before Higgins managed to break free). This time Higgins led 10-4, but wasn't able to hold Selby back.

Williams: In his prime he exemplified the person who could play like it means nothing when it means everything. Most players with a great temperament seem to carry an incredible intensity with their play (Hendry, Higgins, Ebdon etc). Williams just seemed so laid back in comparison. He had a major role dismounting Hendry from the top in the late 90s with some memorable wins. Obviously, there was the black ball final in the Masters 98, but perhaps more significantly the 97 British where he thrashed Hendry 9-2. The latter was a real shocker at the time because Hendry was way ahead at #1. Williams just didn't care, he had no respect for reputations.

Ebdon: If anything Ebdon may have relied more on the mental aspect of the game than any of the aforementioned players. He had an incredible self belief that seemed beyond what he could reasonably expect of his abilities as a player. Ultimately though, he has proved his doubters wrong with World and UK Championship wins, along with many ranking titles. With such impressive achievements it would be reasonable to consider Ebdon as a snooker great, but strangely it seemed that he was normally the underdog in his challenges – though I doubt Ebdon would see it that way.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Cloud Strife

sas6789 wrote:
Cloud Strife wrote:Certainly not Davis or Hendry. Both of those were flat-track bullies who crumbled when someone actually fought back at them or didn't bottle it against them.

Probably go with Higgins. Maybe Selby too.

Idiot.


Perhaps you'd like to put forward a counter-argument instead of resorting to petty insults?

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Cheshire Cat

I'm inclined to say Williams. He rarely, if ever, shows any frustration, which is one of the reasons I admire him so much. The 2000 World final is an exception. I thought the first 2 sessions were MJW at his very worst; in the second session, he looked like he didn't care and was throwing the match away. But that was an exception.

In terms of pure bottle and never-say-never attitude, Selby may well be right up there, if not the best. But temperament? Really? A guy who seeks reassurance from his box every other shot, and particularly over the past season or two has been prone to stamping and other noticeable tidbits of frustration; if we're talking pure temperament, he wouldn't be my choice.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Pink Ball

Cloud Strife wrote:
sas6789 wrote:
Cloud Strife wrote:Certainly not Davis or Hendry. Both of those were flat-track bullies who crumbled when someone actually fought back at them or didn't bottle it against them.

Probably go with Higgins. Maybe Selby too.

Idiot.


Perhaps you'd like to put forward a counter-argument instead of resorting to petty insults?

Idiot rofl

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Wildey

Cloud Strife wrote:
sas6789 wrote:
Cloud Strife wrote:Certainly not Davis or Hendry. Both of those were flat-track bullies who crumbled when someone actually fought back at them or didn't bottle it against them.

Probably go with Higgins. Maybe Selby too.

Idiot.


Perhaps you'd like to put forward a counter-argument instead of resorting to petty insults?

in 2002 when way past his best and ROS was defending world champion where others would fold against the intimidation by Ronnie "ill send him back to his sad little life in scotland" infamous quote. Hendry rose to the occasion and was by a mile his best performance during that WC that takes unbelievable Temperament to do that against the odds.

now can we all go back to calling you the idiot you are <ok>

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby vodkadiet

Cheshire Cat wrote:I'm inclined to say Williams. He rarely, if ever, shows any frustration, which is one of the reasons I admire him so much. The 2000 World final is an exception. I thought the first 2 sessions were MJW at his very worst; in the second session, he looked like he didn't care and was throwing the match away. But that was an exception.

In terms of pure bottle and never-say-never attitude, Selby may well be right up there, if not the best. But temperament? Really? A guy who seeks reassurance from his box every other shot, and particularly over the past season or two has been prone to stamping and other noticeable tidbits of frustration; if we're talking pure temperament, he wouldn't be my choice.


Well, if it is based on never showing frustration, then Nigel Bond would be hard to beat.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby TheSaviour

Romford Is The Word.

Seems posters or people generally are not looking anymore any advantage like these.. Working with some "supreme" people.. When even if there would be such it wouldn´t make in any sense.

Any thing what ever it is needs to be be deserved. If it is too akward or weird then it is not deserved at all. That´s how that word "deserve" quite precisely works. Barry Hearn just can´t give any strange wildcards. Even if there would be some players with a great temperaments. Because then it wouldn´t be traditionally deserved.

Barry just needs to keep it going and running, and always respect the results. So this is somehow a weird topic. A very much speculative question which doesn´t have anything to do with how Barry should run the whole thing, or how we are supposed to follow it without wanting to give it up.

Surely it would be someone who can just keeps coming back and always playing at least almost spot on snooker. Not winning much and not playing consistently well during the big tournaments. Those are the things most of the fans are always ACTUALLY looking forward.

So Romford Is The Word. This time. Many fans would already now pay the tickets to see Mark King playing somewhere over the future on just any tiny match. Because he won´t make much any mistakes and is a very human character. Well he actually is a great, great player. That´s what many would at least now admit.

Mark Selby never was that much tough anyway. He has just almost a flawless back-up to have a great career. I wouldn´t be that much surprised if he just keep showing up and playing really well during a "Woodstock Moments". When everyone are on the crest of a wave. A Woodstock Moment. What a trip to Tomorrowland! Or to Woodstock! Well he has an every right to do so. Anyone including Barry can just respects the laws.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby SnookerFan

rofl rofl rofl rofl

The Saviour says Romford is the Word. So, of course, what he's saying is that Mark King has the best temperament. Who else could he have been talking about?

And, of course, give Mark King a wild card. Despite actually, y'know, still being on the tour.

Or something.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Dan-cat

Saviour, your cultural references are extremely broad. Tomorrowland! A huge electronic music festival held in Belgian. Never been but is on my list. Woodstock? I'm a bit late for that one.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Johnny Bravo

Hendry crumbled once the opposition rose. His last major title came at the age of 30. He never won anything important after that.

It's between Selby and Higgins. Although Selby is a better grinder, I feel that Higgins edges it. He always seems to play the right shot, no matter the circumstances.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Dan-cat

Johnny Bravo wrote:Hendry crumbled once the opposition rose. His last major title came at the age of 30. He never won anything important after that.

It's between Selby and Higgins. Although Selby is a better grinder, I feel that Higgins edges it. He always seems to play the right shot, no matter the circumstances.


Maybe he just lost the hunger.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby sas6789

Johnny Bravo wrote:Hendry crumbled once the opposition rose. His last major title came at the age of 30. He never won anything important after that.

It's between Selby and Higgins. Although Selby is a better grinder, I feel that Higgins edges it. He always seems to play the right shot, no matter the circumstances.

It's called passing your best stupid

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Cloud Strife

sas6789 wrote:
Johnny Bravo wrote:Hendry crumbled once the opposition rose. His last major title came at the age of 30. He never won anything important after that.

It's between Selby and Higgins. Although Selby is a better grinder, I feel that Higgins edges it. He always seems to play the right shot, no matter the circumstances.

It's called passing your best stupid


Passing your best at the age of 27? Yeah okay.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Snooker-Fan2016

Cloud Strife wrote:
sas6789 wrote:
Johnny Bravo wrote:Hendry crumbled once the opposition rose. His last major title came at the age of 30. He never won anything important after that.

It's between Selby and Higgins. Although Selby is a better grinder, I feel that Higgins edges it. He always seems to play the right shot, no matter the circumstances.

It's called passing your best stupid


Passing your best at the age of 27? Yeah okay.

Sportsman reach and pass their peak at different ages and points in their career and snooker's no different.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby sas6789

Snooker-Fan2016 wrote:
Cloud Strife wrote:
sas6789 wrote:
Johnny Bravo wrote:Hendry crumbled once the opposition rose. His last major title came at the age of 30. He never won anything important after that.

It's between Selby and Higgins. Although Selby is a better grinder, I feel that Higgins edges it. He always seems to play the right shot, no matter the circumstances.

It's called passing your best stupid


Passing your best at the age of 27? Yeah okay.

Sportsman reach and pass their peak at different ages and points in their career and snooker's no different.

Exactly, but you'll never get that through what Bravo and Cloud Strife have for a brain.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Cloud Strife

sas6789 wrote:
Snooker-Fan2016 wrote:
Cloud Strife wrote:
sas6789 wrote:
Johnny Bravo wrote:Hendry crumbled once the opposition rose. His last major title came at the age of 30. He never won anything important after that.

It's between Selby and Higgins. Although Selby is a better grinder, I feel that Higgins edges it. He always seems to play the right shot, no matter the circumstances.

It's called passing your best stupid


Passing your best at the age of 27? Yeah okay.

Sportsman reach and pass their peak at different ages and points in their career and snooker's no different.

Exactly, but you'll never get that through what Bravo and Cloud Strife have for a brain.


Chill out, son. You seem very antagonistic today for whatever reason. You obviously don't take it very well when someone has a differing viewpoint to your own.

These are all opinions at the end of the day. There is no definitive right or wrong answer. So stick your dummy back in your mouth and try not to chuck your toys out of the pram the next time you see an opinion that you don't like, you big baby.

Re: Who Has The Greatest Temperament In Snooker History

Postby Cloud Strife

Snooker-Fan2016 wrote:
Cloud Strife wrote:
sas6789 wrote:
Johnny Bravo wrote:Hendry crumbled once the opposition rose. His last major title came at the age of 30. He never won anything important after that.

It's between Selby and Higgins. Although Selby is a better grinder, I feel that Higgins edges it. He always seems to play the right shot, no matter the circumstances.

It's called passing your best stupid


Passing your best at the age of 27? Yeah okay.

Sportsman reach and pass their peak at different ages and points in their career and snooker's no different.


Yeah, you're right, but regarding Hendry why does it have to be set in stone that he was passed his prime at the age of 27? There could be a number of reasons why he was no longer dominant despite still being at his best.