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Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby davisfan

Steve Davis has been involved in a few of these, but then he was an unstoppable sex winning machine so losses to unheralded players would always be shocks. Two that were yuge were first round WC defeats (Tony Knowles, 1-10, 1982; Peter Ebdon, 4-10, 1992).

Damn those years ending in 2.

A non-Steve shock was the lone major tournament win by Chris Small, the LG Cup in 2002 (2 again!). He beat John Higgins 5-1 and ROS 5-1 in successive rounds on his way to the title.

Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby SnookerFan

SnookerFan wrote:Not the most famous result. But I was surprised when Tian Pengfei knocked Ronnie out of the 2010 China Open.


Talking about lesser known/remembered/cared about results from the China Open, I'll bring up my favorite match again. Lu Ning beating Shaun Murphy in the 2012 China. I know in a best of nine match these results do sometimes happen, and Lu winning 5-2 might just suggest that Murphy had an off day as much as anything. But it has always some how stuck with me somehow.

It was more the way Murphy took defeat, I think. After the match, Murphy sat starring at his feet. We joke about Murphy always having to run to the camera to offer his opinion on something, but he was about as far from that here. In fact, I've never seen him like that. He looked as dejected I've ever seen a player. I almost thought he was going to pull an Alex Higgins and start ordering vodka.

Obviously nowhere near the biggest shock in history, but if we use the word upset, it's definitely ranks as the most upset I've seen a player after losing to a lower ranked player.

Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby Cloud Strife

Badsnookerplayer wrote:Apologies - missed earlier thread


No, I wasn't having a go or anything. Just put those links up there for a laugh.

Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby eraserhead

kolompar wrote:World Seniors 2017:
Peter Lines 3-0 Sourface

I was more shocked Hendry decided to play in it.

Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby gallantrabbit

The TK game in 1982 was huge. Davis had been completely dominant throughout the season and no-one gave TK a chance. Even at 8-1 a lot of people thought Davis could come back. The Ebdon game wasn't that much of a shock. Davis was struggling big time and we all knew Ebdon's potential.Ebdon had 6 breaks over 50. Davis not one.


davisfan wrote:Steve Davis has been involved in a few of these, but then he was an unstoppable sex winning machine so losses to unheralded players would always be shocks. Two that were yuge were first round WC defeats (Tony Knowles, 1-10, 1982; Peter Ebdon, 4-10, 1992).

Damn those years ending in 2.

A non-Steve shock was the lone major tournament win by Chris Small, the LG Cup in 2002 (2 again!). He beat John Higgins 5-1 and ROS 5-1 in successive rounds on his way to the title.

Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby gallantrabbit

Hendry losing to Steve James in 1991. James was just potting them from everywhere, but few believed that Hendry wouldn't produce in the end.
I'd seen him struggle to a 13-12 over Dean Reynolds in the previous round and never in a million years thought he could live with Hendry.

Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby eraserhead

Badsnookerplayer wrote:
eraserhead wrote:Mark Allen was right about Mark Joyce!

Why - has he been acting up?

He beat Ronnie. :no:

Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby TheSaviour

Snookerfan

Pengfei is a great player, mate. Not really surprise at all if he beats anyone. The victories and titles comes and goes. Almost impossible to predict how those draws will widen out. I could argue Mark Selby is almost certain to win the Worlds this year and probably next year also. And so on. He is a now what Steve Davis used to be in the 80s during his hottest years. But even there is a big IF these days. Because it is still the physics of the game. And no-one can really master it. Well Reanne Evans is virtually sure to win the Ladies titles. But I take it she has a physiological advantage over there. A so called upper-hand that´s then. That´s gone when she plays against top male players. Mens are better because they practise snooker more. A more traditions to play snooker. Now, Ronnie travelled all the way from London to Peking to win a ONE match. PLAYED FIVE FRAMES OF GAME OF SNOOKER. And then those 9 miserable frames more against Mark Joyce. After that crashed out of the tournament. That´s highly debatable if that´s actually the biggest shock in the history of snooker. He played really intriguing snooker, and showed everyone how difficult it actually is. He took a one pot, took a one pot, and showed there´s not much he could do to open up the rest of the reds. No-one could have any better effort to split the reds. Not even Mark Selby, Reanne Evans, or John Higgins. So a mission complete. But was all that a worth of a trip all the way to China. Joyce played some stupendous stuff to beat him. Those things are always bound to happen and Ronnie knows that. He must be awfully disappointed now heading back to home. Same with Jimmy White. I got a message that now Ronnie played something I should take notice at lol. Everything has sky-rocketed now. :chin: :chin: :chin:

Either way, a great stuff from Ronnie once again. And there´s nothing surprising or unusual about it. Ronnie is Ronnie. People are just different. Each for their own.
Last edited by TheSaviour on 16 May 2017, edited 3 times in total.

Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby SnookerFan

I was seeing it more in context. At the time, nobody really would've given him much chance of beating Ronnie.

As I said, not one of the biggest upsets ever. Just one I remembered, for whatever reason.

Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby SnookerFan

Pink Ball wrote:Davis v Higgins 2010.


Good shout. :hatoff:

I hate that this happened seven years ago though. You sure it wasn't more like 2015 that it happened? :grrr:

Re: Biggest shock in snooker history

Postby SnookerFan

eraserhead wrote:Speaking of 2015 was anyone expecting Stuart Bingham world champion.


I wouldn't have picked Bingham as a favourite before the tournament started. I don't think anybody would.

But, at the same time, the BBC were doing my nut pre-final. They kept going on about how it would've been shock of the century if Bingham, the World number 10 at the time, beat Murphy the world number 8.

I would say, as thoroughly surprising as Bingham's win was, Joe Johnson's 1986 win was more surprising. Bingham had, at least, won two ranking events before he won The Crucible. Also, Johnson had never won a match at the venue at all.

Though, of course, me saying Bingham winning was a smaller surprise is being said after he won. It's easier to claim something isn't a surprise once it's happened.